September 8, 2014
shigaisen:

NAMAZU THE CATFISH
In Japanese mythology, the Namazu (鯰) or Ōnamazu (大鯰) is a giant catfish who causes earthquakes. He lives in the mud under the islands of Japan, and is guarded by the god Kashima who restrains the catfish with a stone. When Kashima lets his guard fall, Namazu thrashes about, causing violent earthquakes.

shigaisen:

NAMAZU THE CATFISH

In Japanese mythology, the Namazu (鯰) or Ōnamazu (大鯰) is a giant catfish who causes earthquakes. He lives in the mud under the islands of Japan, and is guarded by the god Kashima who restrains the catfish with a stone. When Kashima lets his guard fall, Namazu thrashes about, causing violent earthquakes.

September 8, 2014
radioactive-kt:

獏 (Baku)
Baku watch over humans and act as a guardian spirits. They feed on the dreams of humans – specifically bad dreams. Evil spirits and yokai fear baku and flee from them, avoiding areas inhabited by them. Therefore, health and good luck follow a baku wherever it goes.

radioactive-kt:

獏 (Baku)

Baku watch over humans and act as a guardian spirits. They feed on the dreams of humans – specifically bad dreams. Evil spirits and yokai fear baku and flee from them, avoiding areas inhabited by them. Therefore, health and good luck follow a baku wherever it goes.

(Source: yokai.com)

September 8, 2014

frozenoverblackballoon:

Beautiful  traditional Japaneses style of painting. Filled with yokai and Japaneses inspired monsters.  I love the court-in-the-act presentation of these pictures combined with there very detailed old fashioned ink appearance.   P.S. This was all painted in digital.   

The artist’s gallery is here. http://raiu-alive.deviantart.com/ Enjoy! 

Post camo from this lagon. http://frozenoverblackballoon.tumblr.com/post/67674246273/beautiful-traditional-japaneses-style-of

September 8, 2014

hakuouki-history:

Yokai pictures by Matthew Meyer

Ok, I’m stretching relevancy here to Hakuouki and/or the Shinsengumi quite a bit, but it’s my tumblr, and I adore Matthew Meyer’s yokai art. (The style reminds me a bit of Michael Hague’s illustrations in childhood fantasy/fairy tale books).

These creatures (and some ghosts) are from all over Japan, and Meyer explains where from, and shares stories with sources about them in the links below. 

I picked some of my favourite pieces of Meyer’s artwork, and also, to be more strictly relevant, I included an oni.

In order, these are

Meyer also has a pretty, more easily-navigable site: Yokai.com, which takes the form of a field guide to Yokai (plus some ghosts and gods), and some people might enjoy that site more, but I love the blog best because of all the extra information about his art and the history.

September 8, 2014
drakontomalloi:

Katsushika Hokusai - Rokurokubi. A drawing from the Hokusai Manga. N.d.

drakontomalloi:

Katsushika Hokusai - Rokurokubi. A drawing from the Hokusai Manga. N.d.

September 8, 2014

ahoahoman:

怪奇談絵詞 (Kaikidan Ekotoba), Monsters Scroll, last part

mid-19th century, unknown author

September 7, 2014

(Source: thejoker6)

September 7, 2014

(Source: sononipo)

September 7, 2014
 

 

September 1, 2014

(Source: photogravure.com, via thestylishgypsy)

Liked posts on Tumblr: More liked posts »